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THE STATE OF DO NOT TRACK IN FIREFOX

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THE STATE OF DO NOT TRACK IN FIREFOX

2011
2012
2013

Mozilla Firefox, Firefox for Android, Firefox OS and Thunderbird all include a Do Not Track feature that enables users to express a preference not to be tracked online. When the feature is turned on in one of our products, an automated signal is sent to all the sites and services you interact with, including websites, widgets, advertisers and applications. Do Not Track is still in an early stage of development across the industry. However, it is supported by all major browsers and a few leading companies have started respecting the signal.

These graphs are intended to provide a view into how many Firefox users are seeking out and enabling Do Not Track in their desktop and mobile versions of Firefox; we currently don't have data on adoption in Thunderbird or Firefox OS. We update this page once a month.

United States

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Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
D.C.
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
N. Carolina
N. Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
S. Carolina
S. Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
W. Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming

The World

Notes

No Firefox user was tracked to generate this data. Every 24 hours, both Firefox and Firefox for Android automatically download the latest list of insecure add-ons and/or extensions to disable as part of our blocklist service. As a Do Not Track signal is included in all requests made by the browser, we can count the number of times we see the signal. No other information is logged on our servers. Anyone with a website and access to a web server can start counting how many users are sending DNT:1, which is how the signal is expressed via HTTP requests.

Part of the data in November and December 2012 is missing. The monthly averages used for those two months are based on the days for which data is available. The way we determine geographic data is from IP addresses at the time when an HTTP request is sent. IP addresses are not logged in the aggregate data set used to create the above graphs.

Further resources

The Metrics team is a multidisciplinary team that uses historical data to drive decision-making.
Ali Almossawi Ali on Twitter
Anurag Phadke Anurag on Twitter
Hamilton Ulmer Hamilton on Twitter
Developed by the Metrics Team at Mozilla